26/2/2017 - Visit to the Anglican Church of “All Saints”

26/2/2017 - Visit to the Anglican Church of “All Saints”

Postby Sonia » Sun Feb 26, 2017 7:09 pm

26 February 2017

Visit to the Anglican Church of “All Saints” to mark 200 years of Anglican worship in Rome


Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Photo acknowledgement and copyright: L'Osservatore Romano
Image
User avatar
Sonia
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5056
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 11:22 pm

Re: 26/2/2017 - Visit to the Anglican Church of “All Saints”

Postby Sonia » Sun Feb 26, 2017 7:24 pm

26 February 2017

VIDEO



Video acknowledgement and copyright: CTV and vatican

Image


ENGLISH

VISIT TO THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF “ALL SAINTS”

HOMILY OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS

Sunday, 26 February 2017

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

I wish to thank you for your gracious invitation to celebrate this parish anniversary with you. More than two hundred years have passed since the first public Anglican liturgy was held in Rome for a group of English residents in this part of the city. A great deal has changed in Rome and in the world since then. In the course of these two centuries, much has also changed between Anglicans and Catholics, who in the past viewed each other with suspicion and hostility. Today, with gratitude to God, we recognize one another as we truly are: brothers and sisters in Christ, through our common baptism. As friends and pilgrims we wish to walk the path together, to follow our Lord Jesus Christ together.

You have invited me to bless the new icon of Christ the Saviour. Christ looks at us, and his gaze upon us is one of salvation, of love and compassion. It is the same merciful gaze which pierced the hearts of the Apostles, who left the past behind and began a journey of new life, in order to follow and proclaim the Lord. In this sacred image, as Jesus looks upon us, he seems also to call out to us, to make an appeal to us: “Are you ready to leave everything from your past for me? Do you want to make my love known, my mercy?”

His gaze of divine mercy is the source of the whole Christian ministry. The Apostle Paul says this to us, through his words to the Corinthians which we have just heard. He writes: “Having this ministry by the mercy of God, we do not lose heart” (2 Cor 4:1). Our ministry flows forth from the mercy of God, which sustains our ministry and prevents it losing its vigour.

Saint Paul did not always have an easy relationship with the community at Corinth, as his letters show. There was also a painful visit to this community, with heated words exchanged in writing. But this passage shows Paul overcoming past differences. By living his ministry in the light of mercy received, he does not give up in the face of divisions, but devotes himself to reconciliation. When we, the community of baptized Christians, find ourselves confronted with disagreements and turn towards the merciful face of Christ to overcome it, it is reassuring to know that we are doing as Saint Paul did in one of the very first Christian communities.

How does Saint Paul grapple with this task, where does he begin? With humility, which is not only a beautiful virtue, but a question of identity. Paul sees himself as a servant, proclaiming not himself but Christ Jesus the Lord (v. 5). And he carries out this service, this ministry according to the mercy shown him (v. 1): not on the basis of his ability, nor by relying on his own strength, but by trusting that God is watching over him and sustaining his weakness with mercy. Becoming humble means drawing attention away from oneself, recognizing one’s dependence on God as a beggar of mercy: this is the starting point so that God may work in us. A past president of the World Council of Churches described Christian evangelization as “a beggar telling another beggar where he can find bread”. I believe Saint Paul would approve. He grasped the fact that he was “fed by mercy” and that his priority was to share his bread with others: the joy of being loved by the Lord, and of loving him.

This is our most precious good, our treasure, and it is in this context that Paul introduces one of his most famous images, one we can all apply to ourselves: “we have this treasure in earthen vessels” (v. 7). We are but earthen vessels, yet we keep within us the greatest treasure in the world. The Corinthians knew well that it was foolish to preserve something precious in earthen vessels, which were inexpensive but cracked easily. Keeping something valuable in them meant running the risk of losing it. Paul, a graced sinner, humbly recognized that he was fragile, just like an earthen vessel. But he experienced and knew that it was precisely there that human misery opens itself to God’s merciful action; the Lord performs wonders. That is how the “extraordinary power” of God works (v. 7).

Trusting in this humble power, Paul serves the Gospel. Speaking of some of his adversaries in Corinth, he calls them “super apostles” (2 Cor 12:11), perhaps, and with a certain irony, because they had criticized him for his weaknesses even as they considered themselves observant, even perfect. Paul, on the other hand, teaches that only in realizing we are weak earthen vessels, sinners always in need of mercy, can the treasure of God be poured into us and through us upon others. Otherwise, we will merely be full of our treasures, which are corrupted and spoiled in seemingly beautiful vessels. If we recognize our weakness and ask for forgiveness, then the healing mercy of God will shine in us and will be visible to those outside; others will notice in some way, through us, the gentle beauty of Christ’s face.

At a certain point, perhaps in the most difficult moment with the community in Corinth, the Apostle Paul cancelled a visit he had planned to make there, also foregoing the offerings he would have received from them (2 Cor 1:15-24). Though tensions existed in their fellowship, these did not have the final word. The relationship was restored and Paul received the offering for the care of the Church in Jerusalem. The Christians in Corinth once again took up their work, together with the other communities which Paul visited, to sustain those in need. This is a powerful sign of renewed communion. The work that your community is carrying out together with other English-speaking communities here in Rome can be viewed in this light. True, solid communion grows and is built up when people work together for those in need. Through a united witness to charity, the merciful face of Jesus is made visible in our city.

As Catholics and Anglicans, we are humbly grateful that, after centuries of mutual mistrust, we are now able to recognize that the fruitful grace of Christ is at work also in others. We thank the Lord that among Christians the desire has grown for greater closeness, which is manifested in our praying together and in our common witness to the Gospel, above all in our various forms of service. At times, progress on our journey towards full communion may seem slow and uncertain, but today we can be encouraged by our gathering. For the first time, a Bishop of Rome is visiting your community. It is a grace and also a responsibility: the responsibility of strengthening our ties, to the praise of Christ, in service of the Gospel and of this city.

Let us encourage one another to become ever more faithful disciples of Jesus, always more liberated from our respective prejudices from the past and ever more desirous to pray for and with others. A good sign of this desire is the “twinning” taking place today between your parish of All Saints and All Saints Catholic parish. May the saints of every Christian confession, fully united in the Jerusalem above, open for us here below the way to all the possible paths of a fraternal and shared Christian journey. Where we are united in the name of Jesus, he is there (cf. Mt 18:20), and turning his merciful gaze towards us, he calls us to devote ourselves fully in the cause of unity and love. May the face of God shine upon you, your families and this entire community!


ITALIANO



VISITA DI PAPA FRANCESCO
ALLA CHIESA ANGLICANA "ALL SAINTS" DI ROMA

Domenica, 26 febbraio 2017

OMELIA

Cari fratelli e sorelle,

vi ringrazio per il gentile invito a celebrare insieme questo anniversario parrocchiale. Sono trascorsi più di duecento anni da quando si tenne a Roma il primo servizio liturgico pubblico anglicano per un gruppo di residenti inglesi che vivevano in questa parte della città. Molto, a Roma e nel mondo, è cambiato da allora. Nel corso di questi due secoli molto è cambiato anche tra Anglicani e Cattolici, che nel passato si guardavano con sospetto e ostilità; oggi, grazie a Dio, ci riconosciamo come veramente siamo: fratelli e sorelle in Cristo, mediante il nostro comune battesimo. Come amici e pellegrini desideriamo camminare insieme, seguire insieme il nostro Signore Gesù Cristo.

Mi avete invitato a benedire la nuova icona di Cristo Salvatore. Cristo ci guarda, e il suo sguardo posato su di noi è uno sguardo di salvezza, di amore e di compassione. È lo stesso sguardo misericordioso che trafisse il cuore degli Apostoli, che iniziarono un cammino di vita nuova per seguire e annunciare il Maestro. In questa santa immagine Gesù, guardandoci, sembra rivolgere anche a noi una chiamata, un appello: “Sei pronto a lasciare qualcosa del tuo passato per me? Vuoi essere messaggero del mio amore, della mia misericordia?”.

La misericordia divina è la sorgente di tutto il ministero cristiano. Ce lo dice l’Apostolo Paolo, rivolgendosi ai Corinzi, nella lettura che abbiamo appena ascoltato. Egli scrive: «Avendo questo ministero, secondo la misericordia che ci è stata accordata, non ci perdiamo d’animo» (2 Cor 4,1). In effetti, san Paolo non ha sempre avuto un rapporto facile con la comunità di Corinto, come dimostrano le sue lettere. Ci fu anche una visita dolorosa a questa comunità e parole concitate vennero scambiate per iscritto. Ma questo brano mostra l’Apostolo che supera le divergenze del passato e, vivendo il suo ministero secondo la misericordia ricevuta, non si rassegna davanti alle divisioni ma si spende per la riconciliazione. Quando noi, comunità di cristiani battezzati, ci troviamo di fronte a disaccordi e ci poniamo davanti al volto misericordioso di Cristo per superarli, facciamo proprio come ha fatto san Paolo in una delle prime comunità cristiane.

Come si cimenta Paolo in questo compito, da dove comincia? Dall’umiltà, che non è solo una bella virtù, è una questione di identità: Paolo si comprende come un servitore, che non annuncia sé stesso, ma Cristo Gesù Signore (v. 5). E compie questo servizio, questo ministero secondo la misericordia che gli è stata accordata (v. 1); non in base alla sua bravura e contando sulle sue forze, ma nella fiducia che Dio lo guarda e sostiene con misericordia la sua debolezza. Diventare umili è decentrarsi, uscire dal centro, riconoscersi bisognosi di Dio, mendicanti di misericordia: è il punto di partenza perché sia Dio a operare. Un Presidente del Consiglio Ecumenico delle Chiese descrisse l’evangelizzazione cristiana come «un mendicante che dice a un altro mendicante dove trovare il pane» (Dr. D.T. Niles). Credo che san Paolo avrebbe approvato. Egli si sentiva “sfamato dalla misericordia” e la sua priorità era condividere con gli altri il suo pane: la gioia di essere amati dal Signore e di amarlo.

Questo è il nostro bene più prezioso, il nostro tesoro, e in questo contesto Paolo introduce una delle sue immagini più note, che possiamo applicare a tutti noi: «Abbiamo questo tesoro in vasi di creta» (v. 7). Siamo solo vasi di creta, ma custodiamo dentro di noi il più grande tesoro del mondo. I Corinzi sapevano bene che era sciocco preservare qualcosa di prezioso in vasi di creta, che erano a buon mercato, ma si crepavano facilmente. Tenere al loro interno qualcosa di pregiato voleva dire rischiare di perderlo. Paolo, peccatore graziato, umilmente riconosce di essere fragile come un vaso di creta. Ma ha sperimentato e sa che proprio lì, dove la miseria umana si apre all’azione misericordiosa di Dio, il Signore opera meraviglie. Così opera la «straordinaria potenza» di Dio (v. 7).

Fiducioso in questa umile potenza, Paolo serve il Vangelo. Parlando di alcuni suoi avversari a Corinto, li chiamerà «superapostoli» (2 Cor 12,11), forse, e con una certa ironia, perché lo avevano criticato per le sue debolezze, da cui loro si ritenevano esenti. Paolo, invece, insegna che solo riconoscendoci deboli vasi di creta, peccatori sempre bisognosi di misericordia, il tesoro di Dio si riversa in noi e sugli altri mediante noi. Altrimenti, saremo soltanto pieni di tesori nostri, che si corrompono e marciscono in vasi apparentemente belli. Se riconosciamo la nostra debolezza e chiediamo perdono, allora la misericordia risanatrice di Dio risplenderà dentro di noi e sarà pure visibile al di fuori; gli altri avvertiranno in qualche modo, tramite noi, la bellezza gentile del volto di Cristo.

A un certo punto, forse nel momento più difficile con la comunità di Corinto, Paolo cancellò una visita che aveva in programma di farvi, rinunciando anche alle offerte che avrebbe ricevuto (2 Cor 1,15-24). Esistevano tensioni nella comunione, ma non ebbero l’ultima parola. Il rapporto si rimise in sesto e l’Apostolo accettò l’offerta per il sostegno della Chiesa di Gerusalemme. I cristiani di Corinto ripresero a operare insieme alle altre comunità visitate da Paolo, per sostenere chi era nel bisogno. Questo è un segno forte di comunione ripristinata. Anche l’opera che la vostra comunità svolge insieme ad altre di lingua inglese qui a Roma può essere vista in questo modo. Una comunione vera e solida cresce e si irrobustisce quando si agisce insieme per chi ha bisogno. Attraverso la testimonianza concorde della carità, il volto misericordioso di Gesù si rende visibile nella nostra città.

Cattolici e Anglicani, siamo umilmente grati perché, dopo secoli di reciproca diffidenza, siamo ora in grado di riconoscere che la feconda grazia di Cristo è all’opera anche negli altri. Ringraziamo il Signore perché tra i cristiani è cresciuto il desiderio di una maggiore vicinanza, che si manifesta nel pregare insieme e nella comune testimonianza al Vangelo, soprattutto attraverso varie forme di servizio. A volte, il progresso nel cammino verso la piena comunione può apparire lento e incerto, ma oggi possiamo trarre incoraggiamento dal nostro incontro. Per la prima volta un Vescovo di Roma visita la vostra comunità. È una grazia e anche una responsabilità: la responsabilità di rafforzare le nostre relazioni a lode di Cristo, a servizio del Vangelo e di questa città.

Incoraggiamoci gli uni gli altri a diventare discepoli sempre più fedeli di Gesù, sempre più liberi dai rispettivi pregiudizi del passato e sempre più desiderosi di pregare per e con gli altri. Un bel segno di questa volontà è il “gemellaggio” realizzato tra la vostra parrocchia di All Saints e quella cattolica di Ognissanti. I Santi di ogni confessione cristiana, pienamente uniti nella Gerusalemme di lassù, ci aprano la via per percorrere quaggiù tutte le possibili vie di un cammino cristiano fraterno e comune. Dove ci si riunisce nel nome di Gesù, Egli è lì (cfr Mt 18,20), e rivolgendo il suo sguardo di misericordia chiama a spendersi per l’unità e per l’amore. Che il volto di Dio splenda su di voi, sulle vostre famiglie e su tutta questa comunità!



Domande e risposte

Domanda: Durante le nostre liturgie, molte persone entrano nella nostra chiesa e si meravigliano perché "sembra proprio una chiesa cattolica!".

Molti cattolici hanno sentito parlare del Re Enrico VIII, ma sono ignari delle tradizioni anglicane e del progresso ecumenico di questo mezzo secolo.

Cosa vorrebbe dire loro circa il rapporto tra cattolici e anglicani oggi?

Risposta del Papa:

E’ vero, il rapporto tra cattolici e anglicani oggi è buono, ci vogliamo bene come fratelli! E’ vero che nella storia ci sono cose brutte dappertutto, e “strappare un pezzo” dalla storia e portarlo come se fosse un’ “icona” dei [nostri] rapporti non è giusto. Un fatto storico deve essere letto nell’ermeneutica di quel momento, non con un’altra ermeneutica. E i rapporti di oggi sono buoni, ho detto. E sono andati oltre, dalla visita del primate Michael Ramsey, e ancora di più… Ma anche nei santi, noi abbiamo una comune tradizione dei santi che il vostro parroco ha voluto sottolineare. E mai, mai le due Chiese, le due tradizioni hanno rinnegato i santi, i cristiani che hanno vissuto la testimonianza cristiana fino a quel punto. E questo è importante. Ma ci sono stati anche rapporti di fratellanza in tempi brutti, in tempi difficili, dov’erano tanto mischiati il potere politico, economico, religioso, dove c’era quella regola “cuius regio eius religio” ma anche in quei tempi c’erano alcuni rapporti…

[salta collegamento audio]

Io ho conosciuto in Argentina un vecchio gesuita, anziano, io ero giovane lui era anziano, padre Guillermo Furlong Cardiff, nato nella città di Rosario, di famiglia inglese; e lui da ragazzino è stato chierichetto - lui è cattolico, di famiglia inglese cattolica – lui è stato chierichetto a Rosario nei funerali della Regina Vittoria, nella chiesa anglicana. Anche a quei tempi c’era questo rapporto. E i rapporti fra cattolici e anglicani sono rapporti - non so se storicamente si può dire così, ma è una figura che ci aiuterà a pensare - due passi avanti, mezzo passo indietro, due passi avanti mezzo passo indietro… E’ così. Sono umani. E dobbiamo continuare in questo.

C’è un’altra cosa che ha mantenuto forte il collegamento tra le nostre tradizioni religiose: ci sono i monaci, i monasteri. E i monaci, sia cattolici sia anglicani, sono una grande forza spirituale delle nostre tradizioni.

E i rapporti, come vorrei dirvi, sono migliorati ancora di più, e a me piace, questo è buono. “Ma non facciamo tutte le cose uguali…”. Ma camminiamo insieme, andiamo insieme. Per il momento va bene così. Ogni giorno ha la propria preoccupazione. Non so, questo mi viene da dirti. Grazie.

Domanda: Il suo predecessore, Papa Benedetto XVI, ha messo in guardia circa il rischio, nel dialogo ecumenico, di dare la priorità alla collaborazione dell’azione sociale anziché seguire il cammino più esigente dell'accordo teologico.

A quanto pare, Lei sembra preferire il contrario, cioè "camminare e lavorare" insieme per raggiungere la mèta dell'unità dei cristiani. Vero?

Risposta del Papa:

Io non conosco il contesto nel quale il Papa Benedetto ha detto questo, non conosco e per questo è un po’ difficile per me, mi mette in imbarazzo per rispondere… Ha voluto dire questo o no… Forse può essere stato in un colloquio con i teologi… Ma non sono sicuro. Ambedue le cose sono importanti. Questo certamente. Quale delle due ha la priorità?... E dall’altra parte c’è la famosa battuta del patriarca Atenagora - che è vera, perché io ho fatto la domanda al patriarca Bartolomeo e mi ha detto: “Questo è vero” -, quando ha detto al beato Papa Paolo VI: “Noi facciamo l’unità fra noi, e tutti i teologi li mettiamo in un’isola perché pensino!”. Era uno scherzo, ma ero, storicamente vero, perché io dubitavo ma il patriarca Bartolomeo mi ha detto che è vero. Ma qual è il nocciolo di questo, perché credo che quello che ha detto Papa Benedetto è vero: si deve cercare il dialogo teologico per cercare anche le radici…, sui Sacramenti…, su tante cose su cui ancora non siamo d’accordo... Ma questo non si può fare in laboratorio: si deve fare camminando, lungo la via. Noi siamo in cammino e in cammino facciamo anche queste discussioni. I teologi le fanno. Ma nel frattempo noi ci aiutiamo, noi, l’uno con l’altro, nelle nostre necessità, nella nostra vita, anche spiritualmente ci aiutiamo. Per esempio nel gemellaggio c’era il fatto di studiare insieme la Scrittura, e ci aiutiamo nel servizio della carità, nel servizio dei poveri, negli ospedali, nelle guerre… E’ tanto importante, è tanto importante questo. Non si può fare il dialogo ecumenico fermi. No. Il dialogo ecumenico si fa in cammino, perché il dialogo ecumenico è un cammino, e le cose teologiche si discutono in cammino. Credo che con questo non tradisco la mente di Papa Benedetto, neppure la realtà del dialogo ecumenico. Così la interpreto io. Se io conoscessi il contesto nel quale è stata detta quella espressione, forse direi altrimenti, ma è questo che mi viene da dire.

Domanda: La chiesa All Saints iniziò con un gruppo di fedeli britannici, ma è ormai una Congregazione internazionale con gente proveniente da diversi Paesi.

In alcune regioni dell’Africa, dell’Asia o del Pacifico, i rapporti ecumenici tra le Chiese sono migliori e più creativi che qui in Europa.

Cosa possiamo imparare dall'esempio delle Chiese del Sud del mondo?

Risposta del Papa:

Grazie. E’ vero. Le Chiese giovani hanno una vitalità diversa, perché sono giovani. E cercano un modo di esprimersi diversamente. Per esempio, una liturgia qui a Roma, o pensi a Londra o a Parigi, non è la stessa che una liturgia nel tuo Paese, dove la cerimonia liturgica, cattolica pure, si esprime con una gioia, con la danza e tante forme diverse proprie di quelle Chiese giovani. Le Chiese giovani hanno più creatività; e all’inizio anche qui in Europa era lo stesso: si cercava…. Quando tu leggi, per esempio, nella Didaché, come si faceva l’Eucaristia, l’incontro fra i cristiani, c’era una grande creatività. Poi crescendo, crescendo la Chiesa si è consolidata bene, è cresciuta a un’età adulta. Ma le chiese giovani hanno più vitalità e anche hanno il bisogno di collaborare, un bisogno forte. Per esempio io sto studiando, i miei collaboratori stanno studiando la possibilità di un viaggio in Sud Sudan. Perché? Perché sono venuti i Vescovi, l’anglicano, il presbiteriano e il cattolico, tre insieme a dirmi: “Per favore, venga in Sud Sudan, soltanto una giornata, ma non venga solo, venga con Justin Welby”, cioè con l’arcivescovo di Canterbury. Da loro, Chiesa giovane, è venuta questa creatività. E stiamo pensando se si può fare, se la situazione è troppo brutta laggiù… Ma dobbiamo fare perché loro, i tre, insieme vogliono la pace, e loro lavorano insieme per la pace… C’è un aneddoto molto interessante. Quando il Beato Paolo VI ha fatto la beatificazione dei martiri dell’Uganda – Chiesa giovane –, fra i martiri - erano catechisti, tutti, giovani - alcuni erano cattolici e altri anglicani, e tutti sono stati martirizzati dallo stesso re, in odio alla fede e perché loro non hanno voluto seguire le proposte sporche del re. E Paolo VI si è trovato in imbarazzo perché diceva: “Io devo beatificare gli uni e gli altri, sono martiri gli uni e gli altri”. Ma, in quel momento della Chiesa Cattolica, non era tanto possibile fare quella cosa. C’era appena stato il Concilio… Ma quella Chiesa giovane oggi celebra gli uni e gli altri insieme; anche Paolo VI nell’omelia, nel discorso, nella Messa di beatificazione ha voluto nominare i catechisti anglicani martiri della fede allo stesso livello dei catechisti cattolici. Questo lo fa una Chiesa giovane. Le Chiese giovani hanno coraggio, perché sono giovani; come tutti i giovani hanno più coraggio di noi… non tanto giovani!

E poi, la mia esperienza. Io ero molto amico degli anglicani a Buenos Aires, perché la parte di dietro della parrocchia della Merced era comunicante con la cattedrale anglicana. Ero molto amico del Vescovo Gregory Venables, molto amico. Ma c’è un’altra esperienza: nel nord dell’Argentina ci sono le missioni anglicane con gli aborigeni e le missioni cattoliche con gli aborigeni, e il Vescovo anglicano e il Vescovo cattolico di là lavorano insieme, e insegnano. E quando la gente non può andare la domenica alla celebrazione cattolica va a quella anglicana, e gli anglicani vanno alla cattolica, perché non vogliono passare la domenica senza una celebrazione; e lavorano insieme. E qui la Congregazione per la Dottrina della Fede lo sa. E fanno la carità insieme. E i due i Vescovi sono amici e le due comunità sono amiche.

Credo che questa sia una ricchezza che le nostre Chiese giovani possono portare all’Europa e alle Chiese che hanno una grande tradizione. E loro dare a noi la solidità di una tradizione molto, molto curata e molto pensata. E’ più facile, è vero, l’ecumenismo nelle Chiese giovani. E’ vero. Ma credo che - e ritorno alla seconda domanda – è forse più solido nella ricerca teologica l’ecumenismo in una Chiesa più matura, più invecchiata nella ricerca, nello studio della storia, della teologia, della liturgia, come è la Chiesa in Europa. E credo che a noi farebbe bene, ad ambedue le Chiese: da qui, dall’Europa inviare alcuni seminaristi a fare esperienze pastorali nelle Chiese giovani, si impara tanto. Loro vengono, dalle chiese giovani, a studiare a Roma, almeno i cattolici, lo sappiamo. Ma inviare loro a vedere, a imparare dalle Chiese giovani sarebbe una grande ricchezza nel senso che Lei ha detto. E’ più facile l’ecumenismo lì, è più facile, cosa che non vuol dire più superficiale, no, non è superficiale. Loro non negoziano la fede e l’identità. Quell’aborigeno ti dice nel nord Argentina: “Io sono anglicano”. Ma non c’è il vescovo, non c’è il pastore, non c’è il reverendo… “Io voglio lodare Dio la domenica e vado alla cattedrale cattolica”, e viceversa. Sono ricchezze delle Chiese giovani. Non so, questo mi viene da dirti.
Image
User avatar
Sonia
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5056
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 11:22 pm

Re: 26/2/2017 - Visit to the Anglican Church of “All Saints”

Postby Sonia » Sun Feb 26, 2017 9:52 pm

26 February 2017

Image
Photo No: 645603214

Image
Photo No: 645605074

Image
Photo No: 645605080

Photo acknowledgements: Getty Images
To purchase photos please contact: www.gettyimages.co.uk
Image
User avatar
Sonia
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5056
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2010 11:22 pm


Return to February 2017

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest